Working alongside the Global Genes team to help our patients find answers isn’t her only job. Stephanie Gandomi, MS, LCGC, Licensed Genetic Counselor, has found herself at the center of the rare community, helping families to unlock DNA secrets that have perplexed even the most experienced physicians. 
“I was always very interested in medicine and how human characteristics could be passed down from generation to generation,” says Gandomi, when asked about why she chose this path. “Even as a middle school student, the topic of genetics fascinated me and that is where my love for this field began. Later in college I discovered that my local university (in Australia) had a genetic counseling training program—so I applied and never once looked back!”
 
So what does a genetic counselor do? They’re a trained master’s level medical professional who works with individuals and families to: Review genetic testing and diagnoses. Review inheritance patterns. Help identify possible carriers in the family.
Gandomi will be one of our speakers at this year’s 2016 Rare Patient Advocacy Summit. She will be part of a panel of genetic counselors providing attendees with information the genetic counseling profession as a whole.
“This is a very dynamic field, full of constant growth and change. It’s important that everyone understands what we actually do in the medical field and our skills can be used in a variety of ways.”
 
We can find answers faster: that’s the crux of what Gandomi hopes attendees will take away from this session.
I want to teach them more about the field of genetic counseling, how important our profession is to the present and future growth of medicine, and how patients should integrate us more into their care teams. We find that many rare disease patients have never even seen a genetic counselor, and we truly believe that our involvement in patient care can help to reduce diagnostic timeframes and make proper care more efficient. I also want people to feel empowered and have the resources they need to advocate for themselves when it comes to genetics and genetic testing.”
 

What questions do you want to hear addressed at the summit? 

Learn more about the event here.

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