Rare Daily Staff

Murdoch Children’s Research Institute has entered into a partnership with Boston-based FDNA for full integration and exclusive distribution of the institutes dysmorphology database POSSUMweb through FDNA’s Face2Gene suite of software applications.

The companies said that POSSUMweb’s database integration will assist clinicians in shortening the diagnostic timeline for patients by providing insights from more than 4,000 syndromes, including multiple malformations, metabolic, teratogenic, chromosomal and skeletal syndromes.

“Partnering with FDNA greatly expands the reach of our data and image library, thanks to the widespread use of Face2Gene among healthcare providers,” said Martin Delatycki of POSSUMweb. “To have such an expansive set of information in the hands of thousands of clinicians across the globe helps us achieve our goal of improving the speed and accuracy of diagnosing genetic malformations and syndromes.”

Face2Gene is a next-generation phenotyping application that uses facial analysis, artificial intelligence, and deep learning to help clinicians discover possible syndromes, genetics or clinical features that may be impacting a patient’s health.

With POSSUMweb’s integration and FDNA’s existing partnership with London Medical Databases, FDNA said that the Face2Gene LIBRARY is now the most comprehensive and trusted source of reference for genetic syndrome data and images in the world.

“Integration of POSSUMweb with Face2Gene vastly increases the amount of data, images, and insights available to our users,” said Dekel Gelbman, CEO of FDNA. “Instant reference capabilities will help clinicians greatly shorten the diagnostic journey for patients struggling with undiagnosed genetic diseases.”

Relevant insights from POSSUMweb will be made available to clinicians through the Face2Gene application for patient evaluations, and the more robust and searchable content from POSSUMweb will be accessible through Face2Gene LIBRARY to POSSUMweb subscribed users.

MCRI developed POSSUMweb in conjunction with Victorian Clinical Genetics Service and Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia.

October 12, 2017