Rare Daily Staff

Eureka Therapeutics, a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on developing novel cancer T cell therapies to treat cancer, and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center entered into a license agreement with Sanofi for the non-CAR use of a novel, human binding domain targeting GPRC5D.

The G Protein-Coupled Receptor Family C Group 5 Member D (GPRC5D) binding domain is a novel target that has potential as a promising option for the treatment of multiple myeloma, particularly for patients who have failed other therapies. It was discovered using Eureka’s proprietary antibody discovery platform and developed under a collaboration agreement between Eureka and Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK).

Multiple myeloma is a cancer that affects a type of white blood cells called plasma cells that are specialized mature B-cells that secrete antibodies to combat infections. Multiple myeloma is characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic plasma cells in the bone marrow, where they overcrowd healthy blood cells. Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematologic cancer and affects approximately 130,000 people, with about 32,000 people in the United States diagnosed each year.

“Targeting GPRC5D has the potential to improve the durability of response from current therapies and to improve the long-term clinical benefits for patients,” said Cheng Liu, president and CEO of Eureka Therapeutics.

Under the terms of the agreement, Sanofi has exclusive rights to the GPRC5D binder for non-CAR use. Eureka and MSK are eligible to receive an upfront payment and more than $1 billion in potential development, regulatory, and sales milestone payments. Eureka and MSK are also eligible to receive tiered royalties on net sales.

Photo: Cheng Liu, president and CEO of Eureka Therapeutics.

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