Adams-Oliver syndrome

Adams-Oliver syndrome

Overview

Type of disease: Genetic, autosomal recessive | Congenital onset | Rare Condition or Disease

Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is a rare disease characterized by an abnormality of skin development (areas of missing skin on the scalp called aplasia cutis congenita) and malformations of the hands and feet (terminal transverse limbs defects). The aplasia cutis may involve only the skin or include the skull under the skin. The terminal transverse limb defects may include webbed fingers or toes (syndactyly) and short or missing fingers or toes (brachydactyly or oligodactyly, respectively). Other signs and symptoms may include additional skeletal abnormalities of the limbs; cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita (a blood vessel disorder); pulmonary hypertension; heart defects; and neurological problems. Severity can vary greatly among people with the syndrome and may be lethal in some cases. AOS is caused by mutations in any of six known genes. It may be inherited in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner, depending on the genetic cause. In some cases, the genetic cause is unknown. Treatment depends on the severity and specific features in each person, and often involves a team of specialists.

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