Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17

Overview

Type of disease: Rare conditions

Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17 (FTDP-17) is a progressive (gradually worsening) brain disorder that affects language, behavior, and movement. Symptoms typically onset in a person’s forties or fifties and typically involve speech. Other symptoms may include repeating things spoken by others (echolalia), loss of inhibition, inappropriate emotional responses, restlessness, neglect of personal hygiene, loss of interest, and rapid or reduced eye movement. Affected individuals also may experience features of parkinsonism, including: tremors, rigidity, and unusually slow movement. Survival after onset of symptoms is typically 5-10 years though there are reports of much longer. Prevalence is believed to be roughly one in one million people, although it is not always diagnosed correctly so prevalence may be higher. FTDP-17 is thought to account for only a small percentage of all frontotemporal dementia cases (please also visit: frontotemporal dementia.). Treatment varies on a case-by-case basis, and depends on the patient’s specific symptoms.

This condition is autosomal dominant, meaning that is it passed from parent to child. We inherit our genes in pairs, one from each parent typically. Our genes are what control the growth, development and function of our bodies. If a mistake or error occurs in a gene, it can cause problems. Autosomal dominant means that if one parent has the condition (therefore the mutation) there is a 50% chance that they will pass it on to each of their children. Treatment varies on a case-by-case basis, and depends on the patient’s specific symptoms.

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